Chicken Galantina

Photobucket

The fridge is still reeling from the holiday celebrations. A lot of things are still there that ideally shouldn’t be there anymore: ham glaze, ribs and the filling used for the galantina I made. I think I went overboard making sure that everything is in place, because I was being prudent and praning. Since we conveniently live near a wet market, I bought another chicken, deboned it (because it’s pretty cool to do it yourself) and repeated the process to make sure nothing is wasted. Well, there was still a small  mound of stuffing left that can’t be used to properly stuff a bird anymore so I just pan-fried and ate it with bread. It was delicious.

Is there really any difference between chicken galantina and relleno? According to the authors of Memories of Philippine Kitchens, Amy Besa and Romy Dorotan, “Filipinos, on the other hand, have sometimes used the terms interchangeably, assuming that the chicken relleno is a Filipino version of Spanish galantina using ground pork, canned sausages, sweet pickles and a boiled egg to stuff the chicken.” Good stuffed chicken is good stuffed chicken.

Photobucket

I’m spending the last few days of being home with a weird sense of nonchalance, like I’m just floating. It’s really uncomplicated. But I try to run to make sure I keep my sanity. Running almost every afternoon also keeps the blood pumping…that and I really don’t want feel the sluggishness as an adverse effect of eating a lot, because when I’m home, I eat sooo much.

Photobucket

I don’t intend to eat less or go on a diet this year. It’ll be the death of me. I don’t really follow through with my resolutions so at one point I’ve given up on listing things “I should do but eventually forget about after the first week”. But there are a few points I plan to continue this year and it involves a lot of things I should do “more often”: go to the gym, cook, blog and interact with other bloggers. In other words, it’s about putting myself out there. And balance, let’s not forget balance.

Photobucket

This is probably one dish you’ll be proud to put out there because it’s so darn purdy. It’s not really that difficult to make and it sure sounds fancy.

Once again, a happy 2013 to you all!

Chicken Galantina (serves 4 – 6)

I did away with the hard-boiled eggs but feel free to use it for your version.

adapted from Memories of Philippine Kitchens by Amy Besa and Romy Dorotan

  • half a garlic clove, minced
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 medium carrot, diced fine brunoise (1/16th inch cubes)
  • 100 grams oyster mushrooms, diced
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 2 roasted red bell peppers, diced
  • 1/4 cup sliced black olives
  • 1/8 cup raisins
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1 large egg
  • sliced onion rings (for roasting)
  • one 4 pound deboned chicken (try to get one that has been deboned whole, without any slits or slices along the back)
  • salt, freshly cracked black pepper, Spanish paprika for seasoning
  • melted butter
  1. In a pan over medium heat, warm the oil. Add the garlic, onions and carrots and saute until softened, around 3 minutes.
  2. Add the mushrooms and saute until they release their juices. Transfer the mixture to a large bowl and set aside to cool completely.
  3. Add the pork, chorizo, bell pepper, olives, raisins, 2 teaspoons salt, 1 teaspoon black pepper, flour and egg to the cooled vegetable mixture. Using clean hands, mix until well combined.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350 F/180 C. Season the chicken with salt, pepper and paprika and place on a surface breast side up. Stuff the chicken with filling. Tuck the wings under the chicken (as if it looks like it’s taking a restful nap with its “arms” behind its “head”) and truss chicken with twine.
  5. Line a roasting pan with the onion rings. Place the chicken on top. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with salt.
  6. Roast for about 1 hour and 15 – 20 minutes. Discard trussing strings and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes to allow for carryover cooking (the heat will still continue the cook the chicken even if it has been removed from the oven). Carve and serve.

 

Advertisements

First feast

Photobucket

Now it can be told: my days whizz by when I’m in the kitchen. I mean, I could kind of remember the sun hitting my face when I opened my eyes and I found myself on the early morning flight back home. Then…everything was a blur. There were good snippets of course: hosting a dinner for my friends, two charity events with the same people, Christmas lunch, and the micro-feast we had this morning. In between these events I was cooking up a storm, making sure time was blurred. In a few days I’ll be back in Manila and I hope I can make the most of the borrowed time.

A neighbor died today, January 1st. I’d like to believe he died a happy 79-year old man. “Life is too short”, his wife told us when we visited. Amen. We might as well enjoy the ride.

In the thick of things I found myself hitting the stress button more than once this morning when a few things didn’t go my way. But all was well, and I still couldn’t believe I put together almost all of what was on the table. Yay me.

Photobucket

The spread:

Now I would consider this paella pretty fancy – with the arborio and saffron. But I still crave the one my Mama Eng usually makes with regular rice and malagkit/sticky rice, with that nice color that only cheap atsuete can give! Recipe here. For two years now we’ve had paella for New Year. Not too shabby!
Photobucket
Photobucket

Chicken Galantina
Photobucket
Photobucket

homemade ham – recipe here
Photobucket
Photobucket

The ribs look glorious if I do say so myself.

Not all the meals I’ll have this year will be grand (I might even skip a meal or two). But I intend to enjoy this year in the company of good people and even better conversations. Let’s put ourselves out there! Happy New Year everyone. 🙂